The Minnesota Vikings lost to a very good Dallas Cowboys team Sunday night.

The fact they didn't have their starting quarterback certainly should have given Minnesota the advantage but c'mon man firing Head Coach Mike Zimmer would not resolve anything this year.

When the season is over then the Wilfs will likely say goodbye to Rick Spielman and Zimmer.

More than likely the entire coaching staff will be seeking employment elsewhere.

I never like to see people lose their job but if you are not doing your job (winning in the NFL) then you should expect to lose your job.

If I'm the Vikings owners I'm definitely making a list of potential General Managers so when the season is over the hire can be made.  I might also make a list of potential Head Coaches so I can give some input into that decision.

The General Manager will probably select a new Head Coach for the team.

Who should the next General Manager be?  I'm not searching the front offices of every NFL team to make suggestions for who might be able to get the Vikings pointed in the right direction.

I am going to make a few suggestions that might raise some eyebrows.

  • Aaron Rodgers, this is partly tongue-in-cheek.  He clearly wants involvement in player personnel decisions. Career is nearing an end.  Unquestionably intelligent.
  • Peyton Manning, a terrific communicator who could certainly help in developing the most important position on the football team.  The quarterback.  Whether he needs the long hours that come with the job is another question.
  • Bill Cowher, NFL commentator and former Head Coach of the Pittsburg Steelers. At 64 years of age unsure if he would be interested in the headaches this job can produce.
  • Tony Dungy, Former Vikings Defensive Coordinator, University of Minnesota graduate would have instant credibility with the fan base.  Obviously knows his football.  At 66 same question about how long he would want to do the job.
  • Nate Burleson, NFL Analyst, CBS This Morning Show Host, former Vikings player.  This is my personal favorite choice. He's 40 years old, seems to relate well to everyone. Clearly loves football. His vertical was 42.5 inches. The Canadian born Burleson went to high school in the Seattle area.  Went to college at the University of Nevada where he received degrees in Human Development and Family Studies.

With talented individuals on both sides of the football it appears to me a ton of roster moves are not needed.  Some, but not a ton.

I know a lot of people get on Kirk Cousins case but for the most part this year he has been very good.  The play calling has been atrocious.  Don't know if he has been given the option to call out of plays and into others for the most success.  It doesn't appear that is the case.

At times I think his brain freezes or something.  For example on one of his negative pass plays Sunday night against the Cowboys he threw a pass to fullback CJ Ham when there were three Dallas players right by Ham.  The play had no chance.

How you can't see that I guess I'll never know.

Cousins is clearly not worth 35 million dollars a year. Especially when you have a limit on what you can spend on your team.

The NFL team salary caps for 2021 are $182.5 million dollars.  I don't know how this works but in checking the cap marks for the teams (ESPN, Sports Illustrated) it appears only 8 teams are below the aforementioned figure.

What is needed is someone who can light a fire under this team and make them more accountable for their actions.  Dumb penalties have cost them in virtually every game this year.

Because the games have been so close even one or two bad penalities can be the difference between a win and a loss.

I would love to hear some of your suggestions.  You can be out of the box like many of my choices.  Innovation is key I think.

Vision is essential.  A clear vision of the goal (Super Bowl win) and a plan to get there.

These are interesting.

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